from Fomrhi Quarterly Bulletin I collected in two pdf files most of the articles appeared in the Fomrhi Quarterly Bulletin related to strings from 1990 up to 2018. I thought that you might appreciate them.  If you do, please consider subscribing to them at the link below. It’s worth every pound (and it is really just

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How a set of strings was composed: keep it simple!  With only 4 “gauges” of pure gut and two gauges of silver wire they could cover all the strings from violin to cello!

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The breaking index rule.  The most important rule you cannot escape from (as far as you are voted to gut strings): at a given string length, a string of a given material, will always break at the same pitch, no matter how big it is.Mindblowing or intuitive? Probably both of them.Looking forward to your comments

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…and wound strings? …so once we got the idea, we can face the question: and with the wound ones? should we increase or decrease the tension? (originally a facebook live)

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5. Conclusions: Be Practical!! So far, you can probably guess my conclusion: If you aim to follow the treatises you shall not give a letteral interpretation but a practical one, and admit that equal feeling, equal tension, and scaled tension, had the same meaning: the aim is always playing on an even instrument. But if we cannot trust

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4. Complications! Another thing affecting a lot our pure math is the arching of the bridge: of course low first (and fourth? ) need to be bigger than high third and second. So, scaling tension is required Plucked or bowed instrument: the big string offers more friction under the bow so someone may think a smaller string

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3. Mystery unveiled: Strings Do Stretch!! …but… not in the same way, not of the same cohefficient… it depends on how are made and, first of all, from their gauge We need to consider the many factors affecting our pure math calculations: the first is, of course, the string! A string which is low twisted and maybe

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1. The Problem Let’s get started: the factors involved and their relationship:  In our equation we have so many fixed factors, that we end just with a very simple equation: (at a given pitch and string length) gauge=tension*(under squared root and multiplied for a coefficient for gut’s mass). If we change one of them, the other

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2. The Experiment …as they admit also in the treatises, pure math does not work! “If the strings have the same thickness and length and one produces a low note, which is a C, when it is stretched with a weight of 1 pound, the other must be stretched with 4 pounds to make it

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